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a pick me up.

My brother has this one habit where if we go for a walk- ten minutes into the walk he’ll given up and he’ll want to be carried. And if you refuse he’ll actually sit on the floor, no matter where we are. Once, me and my mum were on the way back from the doctors and he just stopped walking and lifted his arms out to my mum which usually means that he wants to picked up. So he’s just standing there and my mum is refusing to pick him up so, we what we do is we take a few steps forward to see whether he follows us but no! He decides to sit on the floor!

It’s quite hard to try and get him to walk for longer so I don’t know how we’re going to go around this. We’re thinking of getting him a bike and perhaps once he learns how to work it, he can cycle instead. Here’s hoping this works and if not then it’s back to square one!

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the importance of teamwork.

I don’t think I can stress enough how important it is for everyone in the family to be involved. That’s one important thing I’ve learnt and I’ve learnt it the hard way.

Around April of this year, I finally hit rock bottom. ‘Stress’ couldn’t even cover it and I wasn’t just mentally frustrated but physically, I thought I was going faint. I remember sitting in front of my laptop trying to finish an assignment, worried sick over an email about me potentially failing a module over attendance and my Dad standing in front of me, harping on about private SaLT’s and whether they’re after your money. As well as being incredibly anxious, I suddenly had this sharp pain on the right side of my head and I remember thinking two things: I can’t take it anymore and What is happening to me?

It’s at this point I knew that I had to tell my tutor at university and it’s at this point I realised how much I had lumbered onto me. My tutor arranged a coffee meeting and that’s when I spilled all the beans and after I had told her, I felt so much better. It’s really important to tell someone how you feel, full stop. One thing became apparent- my siblings weren’t involved. I always knew this of course, but when my tutor asked about whether I had any other siblings, it became apparent that not only had I noticed but someone from the outside looking in realised that it was just me. And on top of trying to be there for my brother and do all these activities with him, I had to juggle university. Being the ‘eldest’ girl especially, it’s normal for mothers or both sets of parents to turn to this specific child for help and advice and just to unload their worries- or so my tutor had told me as she went through something similar being the eldest girl.

I don’t mind my parents telling me abc or asking me questions abc, it’s just- sometimes, I need a break and I’d appreciate if someone were to come and take over from me for just ten minutes. This is one reason why I would like this to become something bigger than just a blog- I think what a lot of people don’t realise is that Autism also affects the siblings. And each sibling will understand it differently than the other. There isn’t a guide that’s given out. There isn’t a handbook telling you all about sibling 101 and how you should act around your sibling. There isn’t anyone there to actually talk about how you feel and for that person to actually get it. 

As the sibling, you’ll forever be asking questions and no one there to answer. You’ll Google things and you might get it but in reality you actually have no idea. How does this exactly apply to you? What does any of this mean? What do I have to do? Questions, questions, questions!

I am definitely more involved with my brother’s autism than my other two siblings. And it’s hard because through this whole journey/process, I’ve sort of developed my own way of carrying out activities with my brother, knowing what might work and what might not and develop my own understanding of what Autism is. I’m not asking my siblings to do what I’m doing. All I’m asking is for patience and understanding and these are things which they lack. And I think it’s because of two things a) they are still coming to terms with it and don’t know how to deal with it and b) they just aren’t informed.

It seems harsh to say now that I re read it but I think there is a slight truth in that. Yesterday, I was hoovering the hallway and there was cord outstretched in front of my brother as he runs towards the toilet. Before I could even react, my brother trips over the cord and falls down. It was my older brother’s responsibility to make sure he went to the toilet so he was just trailing behind him and I was frustrated with him.

Me: “Why didn’t you stop him?!”

OB: “How is it my fault?!”

M: “Couldn’t you see the cord! You should’ve pulled him back!”

OB: “How was I to know he’d run through it and not walk over it?”

M: *sigh*

It’s circumstances like the above that make me wish they were more involved. My parents and I both know that my younger brother would walk through things like that instead of going over. It’s just how he is, he doesn’t notice these things. And it really irked me when he said that he didn’t know. It really did.

I also remember the time where it was perhaps a few months after my brother was diagnosed with Autism that something happened with my sister and I regarding my little brother and she said “No one told me he had Autism”. This is the thing. She knew our brother was autistic but what I inferred from this was “I don’t know what to do or what Autism is”. I really do with there was something for siblings and that would be a dream for me: to perhaps create a group where people can attend, talk about things, just chill out, learn what Autism is- maybe even create like a booklet letting people know that it’s ok to feel like this and here’s what you should know: you are not alone.

All that I know of Autism is because of the fact that I became my mum’s pillar of support and I decided to read the full 101. I’m not an expert and in no way do I get things straight away. It takes a while for me to understand something and think, how does this apply to my brother? Maybe if my siblings had something that allowed them to understand Autism better and see how this effects our younger sibling then perhaps, they’ll be able to interact with him better. And then maybe we as siblings can sit down and have a chat and when my parents are unsure about something, we can all contribute to the conversation instead of it just being me and my parents.

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Never Gone..

Hooray for a Backstreet Boys reference!

It’s been a while, and I feel like now is a good time to pick up from where I left off. A lot has happened since the last post and I hope you silent readers haven’t missed me too much! (joke). I have so much to say and I really don’t know where to start.

How have you all been?

My first year of university just whizzed by and I’ve been off for almost three months, just hopelessly looking for a non existent part time job to keep me busy during my time off from uni. My brother who is now 6, going on to 7 has just finished his school year and will be going on to Year 2 this coming September. He’s going to be in the same class with the same teacher and when my mum first heard this, she panicked a bit because she thought he was going to be held back but luckily, we got this clarified.

And yes, my brother is still non verbal.

On the last post, I mentioned that I had hoped that 2014 would be the year where my brother would improve his understanding or even his speech and I think I can honestly say that there have been some improvement in regards to his understanding. In regards to his speech, there’s been a tiny bit but I think I’ll make a separate post on that. Actually, I’ll just make a separate post on everything that’s happened since my time off from this blog.

I’m hoping that from now on, I’ll be active on this blog because now that we’re both growing older, I think it’s important to record these things because later when we look back, it’ll be really interesting.

I’ll sign off from here for now and work on a few posts for next few days!

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Its the end of an eventful chapter.

My baby brother is finishing nursery tomorrow and for all of us, its a pretty emotional time because it just shows how far he’s come. Looking back, it highlights how much he’s improved and how much theres still left but all in good time.

On Monday, my parents had to visit the school he was going to go to in September and his head teacher was there. And once he saw her, he ran up to her and gave her cuddles with his arms round her neck. Its amazing that just a year ago, he didnt want anything to do with her but through a lot of intensive interaction, he’s some to love her- just like we do :’) We owe so so so much to this lady, its unbelievable. Well, not just her but to his key workers as well.

I think sometimes when you try to do your best with a child with autism, you could throw them at the deep end straight away but sometimes and perhaps majority of the time- the best way to get a child with autism to do things is to start off with intensive interaction. In simple terms, includes lots of hugs and cuddles. Such a simple method can have a huge impact with interaction between the child and the person. I believe its the best method to use before doing anything- especially PECs. When my brother started nursery, he was immedietly thrown at the deep end with PECs. He couldn’t do it. He didn’t understand it, he didn’t know any of these people, he absolutely H A T E D it! However, after scrapping that idea and spending months using intensive interaction to I guess, get to know her, (or whoever was the keyworker at the time) in a way, it enabled him to trust him and whenever any of them walked into the room, he would always look at them- so his eye contact improved HUGELY.

A few months later, they decided to try PECs again and success. He did it because he knew it was ok. And the keyworkers thankfully were patient enough to try and try again. Its amazing to see how far he’s come. He’s babbling more which is great!. I remember in English, we studied this  person who said that when parents try to correct their childs speech, they won’t repeat whatever said. So I decided to do the opposite with me copying what he’s saying and it actually helps him to babble more. I would rather have him babble then not say anything at all. And hopefully by him continuing to babble it’ll help him form words and perhaps go onto the next stage of learning language. *fingers crossed* I’m actually looking forward to the future and having those moments where everything that you’ve done to said point was worth it 🙂